Discussion:
Burn temperature reducer
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Gregory Sullivan
2017-11-11 19:52:56 UTC
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I'm looking for a chemical that reduces the burn temperature of stars.
d***@gmail.com
2017-11-12 04:30:39 UTC
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Post by Gregory Sullivan
I'm looking for a chemical that reduces the burn temperature of stars.
You mean that reduces the temperature needed to sustain their burning? Or that acts as a heat sink to lower the temperature of the compo on fire?

A lot of things can do the latter -- water for one. If part of the composition comes with waters of hydration, or is just damp in some quasi-stable way until the star is ignited, the heat of vaporiz'n of that water gets taken away.

For the former, you need a catalyst. Sulfur is said to act in part catalytically in many star redox rxns. It's not your classic catalyst in that it takes more than a tiny pinch, & it does get consumed itself, but it's what makes BP easier to catch & faster burning than just a charcoal-KNO3 mixture, & similarly w both perchlorate & chlorate compos.

S can act in the former capacity too, because if it's used in stoichiometric excess it needs heat to sublimate it. So S is said to deepen some flame colors by shifting the burn temperature to one where certain emission lines dominate more.

Robert
b***@gmail.com
2017-11-14 07:01:54 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
Post by Gregory Sullivan
I'm looking for a chemical that reduces the burn temperature of stars.
You mean that reduces the temperature needed to sustain their burning? Or that acts as a heat sink to lower the temperature of the compo on fire?
A lot of things can do the latter -- water for one. If part of the composition comes with waters of hydration, or is just damp in some quasi-stable way until the star is ignited, the heat of vaporiz'n of that water gets taken away.
For the former, you need a catalyst. Sulfur is said to act in part catalytically in many star redox rxns. It's not your classic catalyst in that it takes more than a tiny pinch, & it does get consumed itself, but it's what makes BP easier to catch & faster burning than just a charcoal-KNO3 mixture, & similarly w both perchlorate & chlorate compos.
S can act in the former capacity too, because if it's used in stoichiometric excess it needs heat to sublimate it. So S is said to deepen some flame colors by shifting the burn temperature to one where certain emission lines dominate more.
Robert
Any extra fuel that reduces the oxygen balance will reduce the burn temperature and any additional non energetic compound will also reduce the burn temperature.
Gregory Sullivan
2017-11-16 06:20:18 UTC
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As I said before,I'm a novice at this and noticed that extremely high temperatures tend to wash out the colours of colour compositions to nearly white. I figured that reduced temperatures brings out the richness of those colours i'm looking for a way to control the burning without stopping the burning process. I tried using Barium Perchlorate for green
burns but it is too hydroscopic to sustain the burn but the colors are rich
green and intermittent.
b***@gmail.com
2017-11-16 15:55:45 UTC
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Post by Gregory Sullivan
As I said before,I'm a novice at this and noticed that extremely high temperatures tend to wash out the colours of colour compositions to nearly white. I figured that reduced temperatures brings out the richness of those colours i'm looking for a way to control the burning without stopping the burning process. I tried using Barium Perchlorate for green
burns but it is too hydroscopic to sustain the burn but the colors are rich
green and intermittent.
Have you tried 80-90% barium chlorate to 10-20% shelac or red gum?
Gregory Sullivan
2017-11-16 18:44:37 UTC
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I have a few pounds of BaClO3 in an unopened bag heard it's not very stable but I will reluctantly give it a try but only in a very small amount to see how it performs.
Thanx

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